• Sylvain Lupari

NODE: Node 2 (2014)

“Powerful, striking and extremely attractive; this Node 2 is in the class of the best Redshift, Ramp, Arc and Arcane”

1 Shinkansen East 10:37 2 The Traveller 8:17 3 Becoming 8:32 4 Doppler 5:07 5 Marche Mécanique 8:30 6 Dark Beneath The Earth 6:06 7 Shinkansen West 11:11 8 No Signa 6:07 9 Thin Air 8:38 DiN44 (CD 73:33) (V.F.) (Sequencer-based style England School)

I remember the 90 's! The Internet years when Napster gave chance to the North American public to find out that the EM of the Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze style was well and truly alive in ... England. If the 70's are the cradle of an experimental and psychedelic Berlin School strongly set ablaze by analog equipments, these 90's belonged to the movement of England School with key groups such as Radio Massacres International, Air Sculpture and … Node. But honestly! Who of us knew about Node? Nevertheless, the English quartet is as much legendary as his career was ephemeral. His only album, an eponym album launched in 1995, had had such a powerful impact that dozens of bootlegs have flooded the underground market. And what I do recall is the music was dark with heavy rhythms which were crushed beneath chthonian ambiences. I am very satisfied to notice that my memory, on this point, was not lacking to me. Because nearly 20 years later, Node cranks things up a notch with a second album soberly entitled NODE 2. Accompanied by Mel Wesson (who replaces Gary Stout), Dave Bessell, Ed Buller and Flood (Mark Ellis) have concocted from almost 20 months, through diverse meetings at the Studio Battery in London, an album where the improvisations of the quartet were linked in the delights of the analog gear in order to redefine the lines of an almost reinvented dark EM. A little as if in 20 years, nothing had moved … And nevertheless.

Tears of music are falling down and spread an aura of mysticism with winds which roar on some floating sonic breezes of which the slow movements of lyrical waltzes open the somber delights of Shinkansen East. Notes of guitar are dragging there. They lose their harmonies in an intense ambiosonic sauna which redraws the lines of the chthonian atmospheres by making them more metallic. The sound effects are as well multiple as intriguing. They weave a sonic universe without borders where the harmonies of absent choirs blow like the death-agonies of souls in distress. We are floating in bluish synth pads which, by moments, sing like gargoyles in search of a passage. And it opens with slow grating noises and dying breaths which let pass a heavy train activated by resonant, agile, nervous and harmonious sequences. The rhythm of